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Anodization of Sputtered Titanium Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Deepak Dhawan
Affiliation:
dhawand3@yahoo.com, RMIT University, Sensor Technology Laboratory, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Swanston Street,, Melbourne, 3001, Australia
Suresh K. Bhargava
Affiliation:
suresh.bhargava@rmit.edu.au, RMIT University, School of Applied Sciences, Latrobe Street,, Melbourne, 3001, Australia
Wojtek Wlodarski
Affiliation:
ww@rmit.edu.au, RMIT University, Sensor Technology Laboratory, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Swanston Street,, Melbourne, 3001, Australia
Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh
Affiliation:
kourosh.kalantar@rmit.edu.au, RMIT, DE, United States
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Abstract

Nanoporous Ti (and TiOx) has been formed by anodization of RF sputtered titanium thin films. A solution of 1M (NH4)2SO4 (ammonium sulphate) electrolytes containing 0.5wt% (NH4)F (ammonium fluoride) was used in the anodization process. Different nano and micro structures were obtained. Voltage in a rage of 2 to 10V was employed in the process. It was observed that the magnitude of applied voltage have a significant impact in the formation of different surface morphologies with various nano/micro structures. The anodized titanium thin films were characterised using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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