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Analysis of Human Spleen Contamination

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Martin Kopani
Affiliation:
martin.kopani@gmail.com, Comenius University, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Sasinkova 4, Bratislava, 811 08, Slovakia, +421-259357454, +421-259357592
Martin Weis
Affiliation:
martin.weis@stuba.sk, Slovak University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Ilkovicova 3, Bratislava, 81219, Slovakia
Julius Dekan
Affiliation:
julius.dekan@stuba.sk, Slovak University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Department of Nuclear Physics, Bratislava, 81219, Slovakia
Jan Jakubovsky
Affiliation:
jan.jakubovsky@fmed.uniba.sk, Comenius University, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Sasinkova 4, Bratislava, 811 08, Slovakia
Marcel Miglierini
Affiliation:
marcel.miglierini@stuba.sk, Slovak University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Department of Nuclear Physics, Bratislava, 81219, Slovakia
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Abstract

We identified both crystalline and amorphous phase of human spleen particles. The silicon particles in the spleen were 10-30 μm large. Silicon, silicon-aluminium and silicon-calcium particles by EDX were found. We assume that the silicon must enter the organism from the external environment and the presence of silicon in the human spleen is consequence of the cleaning function of human spleen.

Mössbauer spectroscopy of studied tissues revealed different phase of iron oxide in the human spleen. On the ground of this consideration we can claim all samples of investigated tissues exhibit presence of two different paramagnetic iron phases, both based on three-valent (Fe3+) atoms. Consequently only 4 different iron-oxides correspond with experimental results. Multielemental composition of iron particles was found by EDX analysis. We suppose that pH and time are significant factors influence biomineralization of iron in the human spleen.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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