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An In-situ Electron Microscopy Study of Microstructural Evolution in a Co-NbCo2 Binary Alloy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Sharvan Kumar
Affiliation:
Sharvan_Kumar@brown.edu, Brown University, Division of Engineering, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
Padam Jain
Affiliation:
padam_jain@brown.edu, Brown University, Division of Engineering, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
Seong Woong Kim
Affiliation:
Seong-Woong_Kim@brown.edu, Brown University, Division of Engineering, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
Frank Stein
Affiliation:
stein@mpie.de, Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Düsseldorf, Germany
Martin Palm
Affiliation:
palm@scholarone.com, United States
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Abstract

The microstructure in a Co-rich, Co-15 at.% Nb alloy was characterized in the as-cast condition. A predominantly lamellar eutectic morphology composed of a Co-Nb solid solution and the C15 Laves phase NbCo2 was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The C15 phase was heavily twinned, with only one variant of twins being present in the individual lamella, while the Co solid solution had the face centered cubic structure. In-situ heating to 600°C in the microscope confirmed the decomposition of the metastable Laves phase into a fine equiaxed, ˜10-20 nm grain size microstructure, and the product phase is the monoclinic Nb2Co7. The individual grains appear faulted. The matrix solid solution retained the fcc structure and no change in structure was observed on cooling to room temperature. Heating to temperatures as high as 1130°C leads to rapid grain growth in the Nb2Co7 phase, and the nucleation and growth of a few new grains within the original grains; however, the reverse peritectoid transformation previously reported, was not observed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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An In-situ Electron Microscopy Study of Microstructural Evolution in a Co-NbCo2 Binary Alloy
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An In-situ Electron Microscopy Study of Microstructural Evolution in a Co-NbCo2 Binary Alloy
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