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An Infrared Study of Metal Isopropoxide Precursors for SrTiO3 *

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

R. E. Riman
Affiliation:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
D. M. Haaland
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM
C.J.M. Northrup Jr.
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM
H. K. Bowen
Affiliation:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
A. Bleier
Affiliation:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA; Presently at Oak Ridge National Laboratories
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Abstract

A Sr/Ti bimetallic isopropoxide complex was synthesized by two methods. The complex served as a precursor to the production of homogeneous SrTiO3 powders via alkoxide hydrolysis. Infrared spectra were obtained for Sr(OPri)2, Ti(OPri)4, and the product of the syntheses. In addition, the IR spectra of the solutions of each of the alkoxides were followed as hydrolysis reactions proceeded. Detailed analysis of the spectral features support the existence of a 1:1 Sr/Ti bimetallic alkoxide. The new Sr/Ti compound exhibits characteristic absorption bands at (1017, 993, 972, 961 cm−1), (844, 838, 827 cm−1) and (620, 596, and 572 −1). A band at 819−1 might also be associated with the new Sr/Ti bimetallic alkoxide. The infrared spectra suggest that the isopropoxide ligands in the bimetallic alkoxide are in at least three separate local environments. This information offers insight into possible structures for the complex.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1984

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Footnotes

*

A portion of this work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE–ACO4–76DP00789. The M.I.T. work is supported by an industry consortium.

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