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An Alternate Mechanism for Porous Si Photoluminescence: Recombination in SiHx Complexes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

S. M. Prokes
Affiliation:
Naval Research Laboratory, Washington D.C. 20375.
O. J. Glembocki
Affiliation:
Naval Research Laboratory, Washington D.C. 20375.
V. M. Bermudez
Affiliation:
Naval Research Laboratory, Washington D.C. 20375.
R. Kaplan
Affiliation:
Naval Research Laboratory, Washington D.C. 20375.
L. E. Friedersdorf
Affiliation:
The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218
P. C. Searson
Affiliation:
The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218
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Abstract

Porous silicon layers have been formed which exhibit photoluminescence (PL) peaks that do not blueshift with increasing porosity. Hydrogen desorption experiments have been performed in vacuum under anneals between 230°C–390°C. Simultaneous, in-situ PL measurements show that the PL intensity decreases and disappears with decreasing hydrogen content. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) measurements also show loss of hydride species in the same temperature range. These results indicate that hydrogen is important in the PL process. We suggest that silicon hydrides are the source of PL in porous SI.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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References

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