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Active Field Effect Capacitive Sensors for High-throughput, Label-free Nucleic Acid Analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Manu Sebastian Mannoor
Affiliation:
msm28@njit.edumanusmannoor@gmail.com, NJIT, Microelectronics Research Center, Newark, New Jersey, United States
Teena James
Affiliation:
tj35@njit.edu, NJIT, Microelectronics Research Center, Newark, New Jersey, United States
Dentcho V. Ivanov
Affiliation:
ivanov@njit.edu, NJIT, Microelectronics Research Center, Newark, New Jersey, United States
Bill Braunlin
Affiliation:
bbraunlin@njit.edu, Rational Affinity Devices LLC, Newark, New Jersey, United States
Les Beadling
Affiliation:
lbeadling@rationalaffinity.com, Rational Affinity Devices LLC, Newark, New Jersey, United States
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Abstract

We report a highly selective technique for the rapid and label-free analysis of nucleic acid sample using Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) capacitive sensors. The binding of charged macromolecules such as DNA on the surface of these Field Effect Devices modifies the charge distribution in the Semiconductor (Si) region of the sensor. These changes are manifested as a significant shift in the Capacitance-Voltage (C-V) characteristics measured across the device. The speed and selectivity of the detection process is enhanced by the use of external electric field of controlled intensity. This simple and high-throughput sensing technique holds promises for the future electronic DNA arrays and Lab-on-a chip devices

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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Active Field Effect Capacitive Sensors for High-throughput, Label-free Nucleic Acid Analysis
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