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3–-D Migration Experiment in Sparsely Fractured Crystalline Rock

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2011

Harald Abelin
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, S–100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
Lars Birgersson
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, S–100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
Jard Gidlund
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, S–100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
Luis Moreno
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, S–100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
Thomas Ågren
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, S–100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
Hans Widén
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, S–100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
Iivrs Neretnieks
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, S–100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
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Abstract

A large scale tracer experiment has been performed in sparsely fractured granitic rock at 360 m depth. Nine different conservative tracers were injected at distances ranging between 10 and 56 m from a drift excavated for this experiment. The upper part of the test site was covered completely with plastic sheets. All the water entering into the drift could be collected. Water flow monitoring shows that water flow takes place in small areas with large dry areas in between. Of the nine injected tracers six reached the test site during the experiment. The fitting of the breakthrough curves to different models could not satisfactorily explain the actual processes involved in the tracer migration. The results of the tracer experiments and the Tritium measurements gave strong support to the notion that a non–negligible portion of the flow takes place in more or less isolated channels.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1988

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References

1. Abelin, H., Neretnieks, I., Tunbrant, S., Moreno, L., Stripa Project Technical Report 85–02, Stockholm, Sweden, 1985.Google Scholar
2. Lapidus, L., Amundsen, N.R., J. Phys. Chem. 56, 984 (1952).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Nertenieks, I., Eriksen, T., Tähtinen, P., Water Resources Res. 18, 849 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Tang, T.H., Frind, E.O., Sudicku, E.A., Water Resources Res. 17, 555 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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