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Ultrafine narrow dispersed copper nanoparticles synthesized by a facile chemical reduction method

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 March 2013

O. Mondal
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, M.U.C. Women's College, Burdwan-713104, India
A. Datta
Affiliation:
Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi-110075, India
D. Chakravorty
Affiliation:
MLS Prof's Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata-700032, India
M. Pal*
Affiliation:
CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur-713209, India
*
Address all correspondence to M. Pal atm_pal@cmeri.res.in
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Abstract

We have prepared stable ultrafine narrow dispersed copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) using a facile chemical reduction technique below room temperature (300 K), without any template. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies reveal the growth of highly crystalline Cu-NPs with an average diameter of 2.2 nm. Interestingly, these Cu-NPs demonstrate both interband electronic transitions along with usual surface plasmon resonance, a unique phenomenon previously unobserved in any noble metal nanoparticles. These Cu-NPs do not get oxidized easily and could be suitable candidates for different optical devices, heat transfer liquids, and biological applications.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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