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Structure and thermal decomposition of a nanocrystalline mechanically alloyed supersaturated Cu–Ta solid solution

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 June 2015

Tanaporn Rojhirunsakool
Affiliation:
Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203, USA
Kristopher A. Darling
Affiliation:
Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 20005, USA
Mark A. Tschopp
Affiliation:
Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 20005, USA
Ganga P. Purja Pun
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030, USA
Yuri Mishin
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030, USA
Rajarshi Banerjee
Affiliation:
Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203, USA
Laszlo J. Kecskes
Affiliation:
Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 20005, USA
Corresponding
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Abstract

The formation of a metastable Cu–Ta solid solution in a mechanically alloyed Cu–10 at.%Ta alloy and its subsequent decomposition during annealing was investigated by atom probe tomography. During annealing, the as-milled Cu-rich alloy undergoes phase separation; Ta atoms diffuse out of the Cu lattice to form Ta clusters and particles along grain boundaries and within the Cu grains. The role of the Ta clusters and the nature of the solid solution as a potential strengthening mechanism for these alloys are discussed.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2015 

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References

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Structure and thermal decomposition of a nanocrystalline mechanically alloyed supersaturated Cu–Ta solid solution
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