Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-2p87r Total loading time: 0.91 Render date: 2021-10-16T04:09:27.175Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Quantitative in-situ TEM study of stress-assisted grain growth

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2013

Sandeep Kumar*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Program in Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521
Tarek Alam
Affiliation:
Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
Aman Haque
Affiliation:
Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
*
Address all correspondence to Sandeep Kumar atskumar@engr.ucr.edu
Get access

Abstract

We present a quantitative in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) study of stress-assisted grain growth in 75 nm thick platinum thin films. We utilized notch-induced stress concentration to observe the microstructural evolution in real time. From quantitative measurements, we find that rapid grain growth occurred above 290 MPa of far field stress and ~0.14% elongation. This value is found to be higher than that required for stable interface motion but lower than the stress required for unstable grain boundary motion. We attribute such grain growth to geometrical incompatibility arising out of crystallographic misorientation in adjoining grains, or in other words, geometrically necessary grain growth.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1Wang, N., Wang, Z., Aust, K.T., and Erb, U.: Effect of grain size on mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials. Acta Metall. Mater. 43, 519 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2Wang, Y.B., Li, B.Q., Sui, M.L., and Mao, S.X.: Deformation-induced grain rotation and growth in nanocrystalline Ni. Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 011903 (2008).Google Scholar
3Haslam, A.J., Moldovan, D., Yamakov, V., Wolf, D., Phillpot, S.R., and Gleiter, H.: Stress-enhanced grain growth in a nanocrystalline material by molecular-dynamics simulation. Acta Mater. 51, 2097 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4Shan, Z., Stach, E.A., Wiezorek, J.M.K., Knapp, J.A., Follstaedt, D.M., and Mao, S.X.: Grain boundary-mediated plasticity in nanocrystalline nickel. Science 305, 654 (2004).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5Gianola, D.S., Van Petegem, S., Legros, M., Brandstetter, S., Van Swygenhoven, H., and Hemker, K.J.: Stress-assisted discontinuous grain growth and its effect on the deformation behavior of nanocrystalline aluminum thin films. Acta Mater. 54, 2253 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6Haque, M.A. and Saif, M.T.A.: Mechanical behavior of 30–50 nm thick aluminum films under uniaxial tension. Scr. Mater. 47, 863 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7Haque, M.A. and Saif, M.T.A.: Deformation mechanisms in free-standing nanoscale thin films: a quantitative in situ transmission electron microscope study. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 101, 6335 (2004).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8Kumar, S., Haque, M.A., and Gao, H.: Notch insensitive fracture in nanoscale thin films. Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 253104 (2009).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9Kumar, S., Alam, M.T., and Haque, M.A.: Fatigue insensitivity of nanoscale freestanding aluminum films. J. Microelectromech. Syst. 20, 53 (2010).Google Scholar
10Kumar, S., Li, X., Haque, A., and Gao, H.: Is stress concentration relevant for nanocrystalline metals? Nano Lett. 11, 2510 (2011).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11Sharon, J.A., Su, P.C., Prinz, F.B., and Hemker, K.J.: Stress-driven grain growth in nanocrystalline Pt thin films. Scr. Mater. 64, 25 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12Kumar, S., Alam, M.T., Connell, Z., and Haque, M.A.: Electromigration stress induced deformation mechanisms in free-standing platinum thin films. Scr. Mater. 65, 277 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13Gao, B., Rudneva, M., McGarrity, K.S., Xu, Q., Prins, F., Thijssen, J.M., Zandbergen, H., and Zant, H.S.J.v.d.: In situ transmission electron microscopy imaging of grain growth in a platinum nanobridge induced by electric current annealing. Nanotechnology 22, 205705 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14Zhu, Y. and Espinosa, H.D.: An electromechanical material testing system for in situ electron microscopy and applications. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 102, 14503 (2005).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15Haque, M.A. and Saif, M.T.A.: Application of MEMS force sensors for in situ mechanical characterization of nano-scale thin films in SEM and TEM. Sens. Actuators A 97–98, 239 (2002).Google Scholar
16Zhu, Y., Corigliano, A., and Espinosa, H.D.: A thermal actuator for nanoscale in situ microscopy testing: design and characterization. J. Micromech. Microeng. 16, 242 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17Kumar, S., Wolfe, D.E., and Haque, M.A.: Dislocation shielding and flaw tolerance in titanium nitride. Int. J. Plast. 27, 739 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18Baratta, F. and Neal, D.: Stress-concentration factors in u-shaped and semi-elliptical edge notches. J. Strain Anal. Eng. Des. 5, 121 (1970).Google Scholar
19Gutkin, M.Y. and Ovid'ko, I.A.: Grain boundary migration as rotational deformation mode in nanocrystalline materials. Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 251916 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20Cahn, J.W., Mishin, Y., and Suzuki, A.: Coupling grain boundary motion to shear deformation. Acta Mater. 54, 4953 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21Winning, M., Gottstein, G., and Shvindlerman, L.S.: On the mechanisms of grain boundary migration. Acta Mater. 50, 353 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22Winning, M., Gottstein, G., and Shvindlerman, L.S.: Stress induced grain boundary motion. Acta Mater. 49, 211 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
23Sansoz, F. and Dupont, V.: Grain growth behavior at absolute zero during nanocrystalline metal indentation. Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 111901 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
24Horton, J.A. and Ohr, S.M.: TEM observations of dislocation emission at crack tips in aluminium. J. Mater. Sci. 17, 3140 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
25Zielinski, W., Lii, M.J., and Gerberich, W.W.: Crack-tip dislocation emission arrangements for equilibrium – I. In situ TEM observations of Fe–2 wt%Si. Acta Metall. Mater. 40, 2861 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Supplementary material: Image

Kumar et al.supplementary material

Supplementary figs

Download Kumar et al.supplementary material(Image)
Image 660 KB

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Quantitative in-situ TEM study of stress-assisted grain growth
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Quantitative in-situ TEM study of stress-assisted grain growth
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Quantitative in-situ TEM study of stress-assisted grain growth
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *