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Elastic behavior of a core–shell metal–carbon nanotube composite foam

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 March 2014

Kassiopeia A. Smith
Affiliation:
School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164
Mohamad B. Zbib
Affiliation:
School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907
David F. Bahr*
Affiliation:
School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907
Maxime J-F. Guinel
Affiliation:
Departments of Chemistry and Physics, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8377
*
Address all correspondence to David F. Bahr at dfbahr@purdue.edu
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Abstract

A simple method was used to electrodeposit a metallic coating on vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays, herein referred to as turfs, creating an open cell, core–shell foam. The foam exhibited highly elastic behavior, approaching the amount of elastic recovery in compression of a pure CNT turf. The turfs were pre-treated with an acid bath, and were electroplated at low voltages with nickel and copper. This simple method can be expanded to prepare a large variety of nanostructured foams (e.g., the carbon support can be changed, the metal deposited selected and its thickness controlled) while maintaining their mechanical robustness.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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