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Doping of TiO2 nanopowders with vanadium for the reduction of its band gap reaching the visible light spectrum region

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 June 2014

Majid Ahmadi
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8377
Maxime J-F. Guinel*
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8377; Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8377
*Corresponding
Address all correspondence to Maxime J-F. Guinel atmaxime.guinel@upr.edu
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Abstract

Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) were doped with vanadium using a novel, facile, and inexpensive method. The TiO2 NPs were dispersed in a vanadyl oxalate solution prepared by dissolving vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) in oxalic acid. A short heat treatment at 400 °C applied to the dried mixture resulted in the doping of TiO2 with a net measured decrease of its band gap by about 0.5 eV, making this important semiconductor material usable in the visible light spectrum.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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Supplementary material: File

Ahmadi and Guinel Supplementary Material

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Ahmadi and Guinel Supplementary Material

Figure S1

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