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Scaling and the Magnetic Origin of Emergent Behavior in Correlated Electron Superconductors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

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Abstract

We discuss three examples of emergent behavior in correlated electron matter, in which the discovery of scaling of several measured quantities with a single energy scale provides a key clue to a common magnetic origin: the emergence of itinerant (mobile) electronic behavior from the Kondo lattice of localized f electrons found in cerium- and uranium-based heavy fermion materials; the emergence of unconventional superconductivity in the cuprate and “high-temperature” heavy electron Ce- and Pu-based 1-1-5 superconductors; and the emergence of pseudogap behavior in the underdoped and optimally doped cuprate superconductors.We conclude with some speculation on ways in which these novel perspectives might be used to design new materials.

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Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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Scaling and the Magnetic Origin of Emergent Behavior in Correlated Electron Superconductors
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