Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-5zgkz Total loading time: 0.206 Render date: 2021-09-23T03:51:09.396Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Optical Storage Disk Technology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2013

Get access

Extract

Optical storage of digital information has reached the consumer market in the form of the compact audio disk. In this technology, information is stored in the form of shallow pits embossed in a polymer surface. The surface is coated with a reflective thin metallic film, and the digital information, represented by the position and length of the pits, is read out optically with a focused, low-power (5 mW) laser beam. When used for information storage for a computer this device is called a CD-ROM, a Compact Digital-Read Only Memory. The user can only extract information (digital data) from the disk without changing or adding any data. That is, it is possible to “read” but not to “write” or “erase” information.

While it is an advantage to have permanently stored information in some cases — for example when listening to Beethoven's Ninth Symphony—in other situations the read-only feature is not appropriate. For most computer applications, it is essential that the user be able to store information on the disk and read it back at will. For example, in a word processing task—such as typing this article — it is often necessary to store the document on a disk. Optical data storage for this purpose is available in the form of a Write Once Read Many times (WORM) optical disk drive. The operating principle in a WORM drive is to use a focused laser beam (20 – 40 mW) to make a permanent mark on a thin film on a disk. The information is then read out as a change in the optical properties of the disk, e.g., reflectivity or absorbance. These changes can take various forms: “hole burning” is the removal of material (typically a thin film of tellurium) by evaporation, melting or spalling — sometime s referred to as laser ablation; bubble or pit formation involves deformation of the surface, usually of a polymer overcoat on a metal reflector.

Type
Optical Storage Materials
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. There are a number of review articles on optical and magnetic data storage: Kryder, M. H., IEEE Trans. Magn. 25 (1989) p. 4358; Sci. Am. 257 (1987) p. 117; G. Bate, IEEE Trans. Magn. 23 (1987) p. 156; G. Kaempf, Polymer J. 19 (1987) p. 257.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2.Freese, R.P., IEEE Spectrum 25 (1988) p. 41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3.Pountain, Dick, Byte (Feb., 1989) p. 274.Google Scholar
4.McDowell, Al, Chapter 3 in Software for Optical Storage, edited by Berg, Brian A. and Roth, Judith Paris (Meckler, Westport CT, 1989).Google Scholar
5.Chaudhari, P., Cuomo, J.J., and Gambino, R.J., Appl. Phys. Lett. 22 (1973) p. 337.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6.Gambino, R.J., Chaudhari, P., and Cuomo, J.J., AIP Conf. Proc. 18 (1974) p. 578.Google Scholar
7.Hallam, Ken, Chapter 16 in Software for Optical Storage, edited by Berg, Brian A. and Roth, Judith Paris (Meckler, Westport CT, 1989).Google Scholar
8.Yamamaka, Y., Kubota, K., Fujii, H., Kobayashi, K., Suzuki, T., and Gokan, H., IEEE Trans. Magn. 24 (1988) p. 2300.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.Forrest, G.T., Byte, (Oct., 1989) p. 249.Google Scholar
10.Risk, W., Pon, R., Lenth, W., Appl. Phys. Lett. 54 (1989) p. 1625.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11.Zavislan, J.M., Kurdi, B.N., and Sincerbox, G.T., in Micro and Integrated Optics for Optical Data Storage, IEEE Conf. Proc., System Design and Network Conference, Santa Clara, CA (1989).Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Optical Storage Disk Technology
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Optical Storage Disk Technology
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Optical Storage Disk Technology
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *