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Commercial Applications of Sol-Gel-Derived Hybrid Materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

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Sol-gel processing readily yields both inorganic and hybrid organic–inorganic materials. Commercial applications of solgel technology preceded the formal recognition of this technology as an important field of study. Likewise, successful commercial hybrid organic–inorganic polymers have been part of manufacturing technology since the 1950s.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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Commercial Applications of Sol-Gel-Derived Hybrid Materials
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