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Woven Structure for Flexible Capacitive Pressure Sensors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 February 2020

Saki Tamura*
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Engineering Department of Advanced Fibro-Science, Kyoto Institute of technology Kyoto, 606 8585, Japan
Justin K. M. Wyss
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering School of Biomedical Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada
Mirza Saquib Sarwar
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Addie Bahi
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Engineering
John D. W. Madden
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering School of Biomedical Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada
Frank K. Ko
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Engineering
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Abstract

Flexible and stretchable capacitive pressure sensors have been developed in recent years due to their potential applications in health monitoring, robot skins, body activity measurements and so on. In order to enhance sensor sensitivity, researchers have changed structure of the dielectric of parallel plate capacitive sensor . Here we enhance the sensor sensitivities by changing electrode composition and explore the use of a woven electrode structure sensor with silver coated nylon yarn and EcoflexTM. The woven structure enhanced sensitivity 2.3 times relative to a simple cross-grid geometry (sensitivity was 0.003 kPa-1). Furthermore, it is also observed that the sensor with the woven electrode also had better repeatability and showed less creep than a device using carbon black electrodes. The woven structure of the electrodes enabled the device to be compliant, despite the presence of the stiff nylon fibres – thereby enabling good sensitivity without the creep seen in softer electrodes.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2020

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