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Phototransistors Based on A Lightly Doped P3HT

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2020

Thomas H. Debesay
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA PhD Program in Materials Science and Engineering, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA
Sam-Shajing Sun
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA PhD Program in Materials Science and Engineering, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA Department of Chemistry, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA
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Abstract

Organic/Polymeric Semiconductor (OSC) based devices have been under extensive study for the past three decades due to their intrinsic potential advantages such as lightweight, mechanical flexibility, biocompatibility, low toxicity, abundant material availability, low cost of processing, etc. A phototransistor incorporates the properties and functions of a transistor and photodetector. In this study, a phototransistor based on a donor/acceptor (D/A) pair (photo-doping) was studied and demonstrated. Unlike in organic photovoltaics (OPV) where 1:1 proportion by mass of the donor:acceptor is utilized to make up the active layer, that ratio appears to be too high for phototransistor applications. According to literature, this 1:1 concentration leads to low overall device performance, lack of I-V curve saturation (kink effect), and bipolar behavior. By altering fabrication techniques and doping concentrations, we were able to demonstrate a donor/acceptor based phototransistor with p-type characteristics with improved performance. In this work, we fabricated a high-performance OFET based on a very small amount of Phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) doped into a Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) host. With this work, a greater understanding behind the optimization of D/A based phototransistors is advanced.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2020

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