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Phase transformation induced modulation of the resonance frequency of VO2/tio2 coated microcantilevers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 January 2018

Ryan McGee
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Ankur Goswami
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Rosmi Abraham
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Syed Bukhari
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Thomas Thundat
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York
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Abstract

Here we present an investigation into the phase change mechanism and detection methods of the metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2). We are able to detect the onset of the phase transition, and track it to completion using both the mechanical and electrical response by depositing VO2/TiO2 layers onto microcantilever devices by pulsed laser deposition. The resonance frequency of v-shaped cantilevers was shown to increase by up to 41 % upon deposition of VO2 as detected by laser Doppler vibrometry. Such a large increase in resonance frequency is ascribed to high tensile stress imparted onto the cantilever during the deposition process. The insulator-metal transition manifested as a 5 % increase in the resonance frequency as a result of lattice compression, resulting in additional tensile stress in the more ordered metallic phase. Electrically, the transition was confirmed by over three orders magnitude decrease in resistance upon heating past the transition. The metal-insulator transition was measured with an accuracy of a few °C when comparing the two methods, however, the transition was much sharper in the mechanical response.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2018 

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Phase transformation induced modulation of the resonance frequency of VO2/tio2 coated microcantilevers
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