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Micro-cellulose sponge from waste cotton as controlled-release Polyphenol carriers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 June 2016

Chutimon Satirapipathkul*
Affiliation:
Chemical Engineering Research Unit for Value Adding of Bioresource, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Phatumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
Pichet Dungsri
Affiliation:
Chemical Engineering Research Unit for Value Adding of Bioresource, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Phatumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
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Abstract

Polyphenol in mango seed kernel extraction has been demonstrated to show benefits against skin disorders. In this study, micro-cellulose sponges (MCS) from waste cotton are used as the carrier for polyphenol to produce a controlled release system. Polyphenol loaded micro-cellulose sponges were produced by acid hydrolysis and a freeze drying method. The microparticles were characterized in terms of size and morphology, total polyphenol loading, and physical state of the encapsulated polyphenol. Polyphenol release from the microparticles was assessed by dissolution tests. The particles had spherical shapes with amorphous form. The controlled drug release was tested by using different polyphenol concentration. The results showed that the structure of micro-cellulose sponges, the media type and the solubility of the polyphenol influenced the polyphenol-release behavior. Since the release of the polyphenol is controlled by the structure and interactions between the microparticles and the cellulose matrix, modulation of the matrix formers enable a control of the drug release rate. These structures of micro-cellulose sponges can be very useful in many pharmaceutical micro-particle applications.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2016 

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References

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