Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-d2wc8 Total loading time: 0.215 Render date: 2021-10-17T23:42:10.257Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Growth Optimization of Multi-layer Thin Film Thermoelectric Materials based on Bi2Te3 / WS2 superlattice Structure

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2019

Mamadou T. Mbaye*
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia23504
Andrew Howe
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia23504
Sangram K. Pradhan
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia23504
Bo Xiao
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia23504
Messaoud Bahoura
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia23504
*
*Corresponding author: mailto:m.t.mbaye@spartans.nsu.edu
Get access

Abstract

Heat is the most ubiquitous form of energy on planet Earth. Every day, the sun continuously strikes the Earth’s surface with 120,000 Terawatts of energy. This solar energy is more than 10,000 times the amount of energy produced worldwide. With the scarcity of fossil fuels looming on the horizon and its adverse effect on the environment many researchers, from academia to industry, are exploring cleaner, greener and more efficient renewable energy technologies. Thermoelectricity can provide an alternative to hazardous fossil fuels as its electricity is produced directly from heat with no moving parts or working fluid. The efficiency of any thermoelectric material is given by a quantity called the figure of merit ZT. For thermoelectric (TE) devices to be competitive with fluid-based and other energy related devices, ZT greater than 2 is usually sought. Here, we report on the fabrication of thin film thermoelectric materials based on Bi2Te3/WS2 superlattice layer structure using RF magnetron sputtering deposition method. Quantum confinement in these low dimensional and ultrathin superlattices can enhance the density of states near the fermi level resulting in higher ZT value. The thermoelectric figure of merit can be enhanced by controlling the layer thickness close to the phonons mean free path. This way heat carrying phonons with different wavelengths can be scattered efficiently resulting in lower lattice thermal conductivity.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2019 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Seebeck, T. J., “Ueber den Magnetismus der galvenische Kette”. Technical report, Reports of the Royal Prussian Academy of Science, Berlin, Germany, (1821).Google Scholar
Seebeck, T. J., “Magnetische Polarisation der Metalle und Erze Durch Temperatur-Differenz (Magnetic polarization of metals and minerals by temperature differences)” 1822-1823 in Ostwald’s Klassiker der Exakten Wissenshaften Nr. 70 (1895)Google Scholar
Velmre, E., “Thomas Johann Seebeck (1770-1831)Proc. Estonian Acad. Sci. Eng., 13, 4, 276-282 (2007)Google Scholar
Peltier, J. C. A., “Nouvelles Experiences sur la Caloriref des Courans Electriques (New experiments on the heat effects of electric currents)”. Annales de Chimie et de Physique. 56: 371-386. (1834).Google Scholar
Wood, C., “Materials for thermoelectric energy conversionC Wood Rep. Prog. Phys. 51. 463 (1988)Google Scholar
Thomson, W., “One the Dynamical Theory of Heat. Trans.” R. Soc. Edinburgh: Earth Sci. 3, 91-98 (1851).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goupil, C., Seifert, W., Zabrocki, K., Muller, E., and Snyder, G.J. , “Thermodynamics of Thermoelectric Phenomena and ApplicationsEntropy, 13, 1481-1516 (2011) doi: 10.3390/e13081481CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hea, R.R., Zhonga, H.Y., Caib, Y., Liub, D., and Zhao, F.Y., “Theoretical and Experimental Investigations of Thermoelectric Refrigeration Box Used for Medical ServiceProcedia Engineering, 205, 1215-1222 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Taylor, R.A., and Solbrekken, G. L., “Comprehensive System-Level Optimization of Thermoelectric Devices for Electronic Cooling ApplicationsIEEE Transactions on Components and Packaging Technologies, VOL. 31, NO. 1, (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dresselhaus, M. S., Dresselhaus, G., Bitter, F., Sun, X., Zhang, Z., Cronin, S. B., and Koga, T., “Low-dimensional thermoelectric materialsPhysics of solid state Vol. 41, Number 5 (1999)_CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dresselhaus, M. S., Chen, G., Tang, M. Y., Yang, R., Lee, H., Wang, D., Ren, Z., Fleurial, J.P., and Gogna, P., “New Directions for Low-Dimensional Thermoelectric MaterialsAdv. Mater. 19, 1043-1053 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DeVoe, T., and Oh, S., “Properties of RF Sputter Deposited Bismuth Telluride Thin Films.” Conference Proceedings (2013)Google Scholar
Snyder, G. J., and Toberer, E. S., “Complex thermoelectric materialsNature materials Vol. 7 (2008)CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Xin, Z., Song, X. H., and Dian-Lin, Z., “Thickness dependence of grain size and surface roughness for dc magnetron sputtered Au filmsChin. Phys. B Vol. 19, No. 8 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Martin, P., Aksamija, Z., Pop, E., and Ravaioli, U., “Impact of Phonon-Surface Roughness Scattering on Thermal Conductivity of Thin Si Nanowires.” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 125503 (2009)CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lim, J., Hippalgaonkar, K., Andrews, S.C., Majumdar, A., and Yang, P., “Quantifying Surface Roughness Effects on Phonon Transport in Silicon NanowiresNano Lett. 12, 2475-2482 (2012)CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Growth Optimization of Multi-layer Thin Film Thermoelectric Materials based on Bi2Te3 / WS2 superlattice Structure
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Growth Optimization of Multi-layer Thin Film Thermoelectric Materials based on Bi2Te3 / WS2 superlattice Structure
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Growth Optimization of Multi-layer Thin Film Thermoelectric Materials based on Bi2Te3 / WS2 superlattice Structure
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *