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Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar AA7075-T6 to AZ31B-H24 Alloys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 December 2017

D. Hernández-García*
Affiliation:
Corporación Mexicana de Investigación en Materiales (COMIMSA). Ciencia y tecnología No. 790, Col. Saltillo 400, Saltillo, Coahuila, México.
R. Saldaña-Garcés
Affiliation:
CONACYT-Corporación Mexicana de Investigación en Materiales (COMIMSA). Ciencia y tecnología No. 790, Col. Saltillo 400, Saltillo, Coahuila, México.
F. García-Vázquez
Affiliation:
Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, Facultad de Ingeniería, Arteaga, Coahuila, México.
E.J. Gutiérrez-Castañeda
Affiliation:
Catedrático CONACYT-Instituto de Metalurgia de la Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí (UASLP), Av. Sierra Leona, No. 550, Lomas 2a. Sección, San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí, 78210. México.
R. Deaquino-Lara
Affiliation:
Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV) Unidad Saltillo, Ramos Arizpe, Coah., México 25900.
D. Verdera
Affiliation:
Centro Tecnológico AIMEN, Relva 27A-Torneiros, 36410, Porriño, Pontevedra, España.
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Abstract

In the present investigation, AA7075-T6 alloys and AZ31B-H24 were joined by the FSW process using the following range of parameters: rotational speed between 200 and 800 rpm, welding speed from 30 to 60 mm/min and a tilt angle from 1° to 3°. In some cases, a tool offset of 1 mm was used into Mg-based alloy. The experimental results show that sound and good joints can be obtained by positioning the tool in the middle of the joint-line using a rotational speed of 200 rpm, a welding speed of 30 mm/min and a tool tilt angle of 1°. The hardness and ultimate tensile strength in the stir zone were 122 Hv and 61.35 MPa, respectively. Also, it is important to mention that the Al3Mg2 and Al12Mg17 intermetallics compounds were observed in the this zone besides some defects like cavities and tunnel.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2017 

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References

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