Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5cfd469876-ws85r Total loading time: 0.258 Render date: 2021-06-23T13:04:18.576Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Article contents

Computational Analysis of Structural Defects in Silica Aerogels

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 October 2019

Hunter Gore
Affiliation:
Dept. of Physics and Materials Science, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. 38152
Luis Caldera
Affiliation:
Dept. of Physics and Materials Science, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. 38152
Xiao Shen
Affiliation:
Dept. of Physics and Materials Science, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. 38152
Firouzeh Sabri
Affiliation:
Dept. of Physics and Materials Science, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. 38152
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

Technological advances in synthesis and preparation of aerogels have resulted in formulations that have the mechanical integrity (while retaining flexibility) to be utilized in a broad range of applications and have overcome the initial brittleness that this class of materials was once known for. Both structural and functional aerogels show a drop in performance when subjected to certain cyclic thermal or impact loading due to the wear and formation of cracks, which reduces their lifespan. Here we present the proof-of-concept of a computational toolset that connects the change in thermal profile to structural failure and degradation. In combination with an appropriate finite element (FEM) solver, we have developed a genetic algorithm that can reconstruct the size and shape of the defective region in silica aerogels given the temperatures from a sensor grid. Results show that a heatmap can be used as the foundation for reconstructing faults and defects in thermally insulating materials. Furthermore, the model developed in this study can be expanded to accommodate other material types. Experimental setup can used to benchmark and refine the computational toolset.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2019 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Allison, S.W., Baker, E.S., Lynch, K. J., Sabri, F., Radiat Phys Chem. 135, 88-93 (2017).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mitchell, K.E., Gardner, V., Allison, S.W., and Sabri, F., Opt. Mater. 60, 50-56 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parajuli, P., Allison, S.W., and Sabri, F., Meas. Sci. Technol. 28 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sabri, F., Allison, S.W., Aryal, M., Collins, J., and Bell, H., MRS Advances 3, 3489-3494 (2018).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brites, C.D.S., Millan, A., and Carlos, L.D. in Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths (Book 49) edited by Bünzli, J-C.G. and Pecharsky, V.K. (North Holland, The Netherlands, 2016) p. 339Google Scholar
Marchetta, J.G., Sabri, F., Williams, D. S., Pumroy, D. W., Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets 55:1007-1013 (2018).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sabri, F., Marchetta, J., and Smith, K.M., Acta Astronautica, 91,173-179 (2013).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eiben, A. E., Smith, J. E., Introduction to Evolutionary Computing, 2nd Ed. Springer (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, Y., Udpa, L., and Udpa, S. S., IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 40,410-417 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Raudenský, M., Woodbury, K.A., Kral, J., Brezina, T. Numerical Heat Transfer, Part B Fundamentals. 1,293-306(1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Computational Analysis of Structural Defects in Silica Aerogels
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Computational Analysis of Structural Defects in Silica Aerogels
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Computational Analysis of Structural Defects in Silica Aerogels
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *