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Radionuclide diffusion into undisturbed and altered crystalline rocks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2018

V. Havlová*
Affiliation:
Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc., Rez, Czech Republic
P. Večerník
Affiliation:
Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc., Rez, Czech Republic
J. Najser
Affiliation:
ARCADIS Geotechnika Inc., Prague, Czech Republic
K. Sosna
Affiliation:
ARCADIS Geotechnika Inc., Prague, Czech Republic
K. Breiter
Affiliation:
Geological Institute of Czech Academy of Science, Prague, Czech Republic
*
*E-mail: hvl@ujv.cz
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Abstract

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An extensive set of porosity, ε, effective diffusion coefficient, De, and hydraulic conductivity, K, data were obtained from 45 granitic samples from the Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic. The measured dataset can be used to define parameter ranges for data to be used in safety assessment calculations for a deep (>400 m) radioactive waste repository, even though the samples originated from shallower depths (<108 m). The dataset can also be used for other purposes, such as evaluating the migration of contaminants in granitic rock (e.g. from shallow intermediate-level radioactive waste repositories and chemical waste repositories).

Sample relaxation and ageing processes should be taken into account in research otherwise migration parameters might be overestimated in comparisons between lab results and those determined in situ.

Type
Research Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
© [2012] The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2012

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