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Serpentine polymorphs and P-T evolution of metaperidotites and serpentinites in the Takab area, NW Iran

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2018

R. Hajialioghli
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, University of Tabriz, 51664 Tabriz, Iran
M. Moazzen*
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, University of Tabriz, 51664 Tabriz, Iran
G. T. R. Droop
Affiliation:
School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
R. Oberhänsli
Affiliation:
Institut für Geowissenschaften, Universität Potsdam, Postfach 601553, D-14415 Potsdam, Germany
R. Bousquet
Affiliation:
Institut für Geowissenschaften, Universität Potsdam, Postfach 601553, D-14415 Potsdam, Germany
A. Jahangiri
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, University of Tabriz, 51664 Tabriz, Iran
M. Ziemann
Affiliation:
Institut für Geowissenschaften, Universität Potsdam, Postfach 601553, D-14415 Potsdam, Germany

Abstract

The Takab meta-ultramafic rocks of northwestern Iran crop out in association with a variety of metamorphic rocks and they can be divided into three types on the basis of dominant mineral assemblage and degree of serpentinization: metaperidotites, talc-serpentine rocks and serpentinites. The peridotite protoliths were mainly spinel-harzburgites and -dunites. The talc-serpentine rocks formed under low-grade conditions and their dominant mineral assemblage is lizardite/chrysotile + talc + calcite/dolomite. Pseudomorphic textures after olivine and pyroxene are typical. Later, lower amphibolite-facies metamorphism produced antigorite, clinochlore and tremolite. Late alteration, assisted by local shearing, produced more antigorite and late lizardite in the metaperidotites. The mineral chemistry of the serpentine polymorphs is variable. Compositions of coexisting spinel and olivine point to an ophiolitic origin. Thermometric estimates from co-existing relict olivine, pyroxenes and spinel are in the range 1000–1200ºC; clinopyroxene barometry yields a pressure of 24± 2.7 kbar for the mantle conditions. Exhumation and hydration followed, and the stability of lizardite/chrysotile constrains the T and XCO2 to <280ºC and <0.002, respectively. Subsequent prograde regional metamorphism took place in an orogenic setting, reaching peak temperatures in the range 410–540ºC at XCO2 >0.1. A Neoproterozoic–Early Cambrian age for the Takab protoliths is suggested on the basis of correlations with the Central Iran Zone. The strips of ultramafic rock in the Takab complex can be attributed to lithospheric remnants of the Proto-Tethyan ocean which closed during the Pan-African orogeny.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2007

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Serpentine polymorphs and P-T evolution of metaperidotites and serpentinites in the Takab area, NW Iran
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