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Nafeasite, NaFe3+(AsO3OH)2⋅H2O, a new framework arsenate from the Torrecillas mine, Iquique Province, Chile

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 June 2022

Anthony R. Kampf*
Affiliation:
Mineral Sciences Department, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 900 Exposition Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA
Jochen Schlüter
Affiliation:
Mineralogisches Museum Hamburg, Leibniz-Institut zur Analyse des Biodiversitätswandels, Grindelallee 48, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
Thomas Malcherek
Affiliation:
Mineralogisch-Petrographisches Institut, University of Hamburg, Grindelallee 48, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany
Bianca Paulenz
Affiliation:
Mineralogisch-Petrographisches Institut, University of Hamburg, Grindelallee 48, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany
Dieter Pohl
Affiliation:
Mineralogisch-Petrographisches Institut, University of Hamburg, Grindelallee 48, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany
Chi Ma
Affiliation:
Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
Maurizio Dini
Affiliation:
Central University of Chile, La Serena, Chile
Arturo A. Molina Donoso
Affiliation:
Chilean Minerals, Iquique, Chile
*
*Author for correspondence: Anthony R. Kampf, Email: akampf@nhm.org

Abstract

The new mineral nafeasite (IMA2021-103), NaFe3+(AsO3OH)2⋅H2O, was found at the Torrecillas mine, Iquique Province, Chile, where it is a secondary alteration phase associated with anhydrite, gypsum, halite, lavendulan, magnesiokoritnigite and natrojarosite. Nafeasite occurs in tightly intergrown aggregates of equant crystals. Crystals are light to medium pink and transparent, with vitreous lustre and white streak. The Mohs hardness is ~2½. The density is 3.23(2) g⋅cm–3. Optically, nafeasite is biaxial (+), with α = 1.679(3), β = 1.682(3), γ = 1.730(5) (white light); 2V = 27(2)°; and slight r < v dispersion. The empirical formulae of the holotype and cotype (based on 9 O atoms per formula unit) are Na0.98K0.02Fe0.92Al0.07As2.00O9H4.01 and Na0.97Fe0.68Al0.33As2.00O9H4.01, respectively. Nafeasite is monoclinic, space group C2, with cell parameters: a = 18.6876(16), b = 8.6769(7), c = 14.8100(10) Å, β = 105.238 (5)°, V = 2317.0(3) Å3 and Z = 12. The structure, refined to R1 = 5.03% for 5979 Io > 2σI reflections, is based on a loose 3D framework of alternating AsO3OH tetrahedra and Fe3+O6 octahedra.

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Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Juraj Majzlan

References

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