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Crystallization of biogenic Ca-carbonate within organo-mineral micro-domains. Structure of the calcite prisms of the Pelecypod Pinctada margaritifera (Mollusca) at the submicron to nanometre ranges

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2018

A. Baronnet
Affiliation:
Université Paul Cézanne and CRMCN-CNRS, UPR 7251, Campus Luminy, Case 913, 13288- Marseilles cedex 9, France
J. P. Cuif
Affiliation:
UMR 8148 IDES, Bat. 504, Université Paris XI, 91405 Orsay cedex, France
Y. Dauphin
Affiliation:
UMR 8148 IDES, Bat. 504, Université Paris XI, 91405 Orsay cedex, France
B. Farre
Affiliation:
UMR 8148 IDES, Bat. 504, Université Paris XI, 91405 Orsay cedex, France
J. Nouet
Affiliation:
UMR 8148 IDES, Bat. 504, Université Paris XI, 91405 Orsay cedex, France
Corresponding

Abstract

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate the fine structure of the calcite prisms from the pearl-oyster shell Pinctada margaritifera. The AFM analysis shows that the prisms are made of densely packed circular micro-domains (in the 0.1 μm range) surrounded by a dense cortex. The TEM images and diffraction patterns allow the internal structure of the micro-domains to be described. Each of them is enriched in Ca-carbonate. Hosted in distinct regions of each prism, some are fully amorphous, and some others fully crystallized as subunits of a large calcite single crystal. At the border separating the two regions, micro-domains display a crystallized core and an amorphous rim. Such a border probably marks out an arrested crystallization front having propagated through a previously bio-controlled architecture of the piling of amorphous micro-domains. Compared to recent data concerning the stepping mode of growth of the calcite prisms and the resulting layered organization at the μm-scale, these results give unexpected views regarding the modalities of biocrystallization.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2008

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Crystallization of biogenic Ca-carbonate within organo-mineral micro-domains. Structure of the calcite prisms of the Pelecypod Pinctada margaritifera (Mollusca) at the submicron to nanometre ranges
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Crystallization of biogenic Ca-carbonate within organo-mineral micro-domains. Structure of the calcite prisms of the Pelecypod Pinctada margaritifera (Mollusca) at the submicron to nanometre ranges
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Crystallization of biogenic Ca-carbonate within organo-mineral micro-domains. Structure of the calcite prisms of the Pelecypod Pinctada margaritifera (Mollusca) at the submicron to nanometre ranges
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