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Preparing Biological Samples for Analysis by High Vacuum Techniques

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 March 2018

S.G. Ostrowski*
Affiliation:
General Electric Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY
T.L. Paxon
Affiliation:
General Electric Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY
L. Denault
Affiliation:
General Electric Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY
KP. McEvoy
Affiliation:
General Electric Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY
V.S. Smentkowski
Affiliation:
General Electric Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY
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Abstract

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Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provide valuable complementary information about the molecular composition and morphology of biological samples, but both techniques are performed under high vacuum, which is not compatible with hydrated samples. Designing a suitable method to prepare biological (hydrated) samples for high vacuum conditions is important to obtain reliable and scientifically meaningful results from ToF-SIMS and SEM and to enable the routine use of these techniques for characterization. This article will compare freeze-drying and critical point drying for preparing adherent and nonadherent cells for ToF-SIMS and SEM analyses.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2009

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