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Cold Temperature Preparation of XTEM Specimens of Embedded Metallic Nanoparticles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 March 2018

Bernt Johannessen
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
David J. Llewellyn
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
Patrick Kluth
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
Mark C. Ridgway
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
Corresponding
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Extract

Nanoparticles (1-10 nm in diameter) are particularly susceptible to disorder, amorphization, deformation and/or dissolution upon ion irradiation as compared to their bulk counterparts, which is a consequence of the enhanced surface area to volume ratio of the former (structural disorder is often observed to be preferentially located at the surface). Synchrotron-radiation-based analytical techniques are ideally suited for the elucidation of structural perturbations as compared to the bulk material. Such techniques are commonly complemented by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). XTEM offers invaluable information with respect to shape and morphology of the nanoparticles.

For the present work, Cu nanoparticles were synthesized within a 2 μm amorphous SiO2 matrix on a 520 μm Si support by ion implantation and thermal annealing following a procedure described elsewhere. In order to study the influence that ion irradiation has on the nanoparticles, the sample was then irradiated with 1x1015 ions / cm2 high-energy (5 MeV) Sn+ ions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2007

References

[1] Sun, D. Y., Gong, X. G., Wang, X.-Q., Phys. Rev. B 63 (2001) 193412.Google Scholar
[2] Johannessen, B., Kluth, P., Glover, C. J., Azevedo, G. de M., Llewellyn, D. J., Foran, G. J., and Ridgway, M. C., J. Appl. Phys. 98 (2005) 024307.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[3] Moller, W. and Eckstein, W., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B 2 (1984) 814.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[4] Johannessen, B., Kluth, P., Llewellyn, D. J., Foran, G. J., Cookson, D. J., and Ridgway, M. C., Appl. Phys. Lett. 90 (2007) in press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[5] The authors thank the Australian Research Council (ARC) for financial support.Google Scholar
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