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Nonscanning Three-Dimensional Optical Microscope Based on the Reflectivity-Height Transformation for Biological Measurements

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 March 2013

Ming-Hung Chiu
Affiliation:
Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Formosa University, No. 64, Wunhua Road, Huwei, Yunlin, 632, Taiwan
Chen-Tai Tan
Affiliation:
Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Formosa University, No. 64, Wunhua Road, Huwei, Yunlin, 632, Taiwan
Tsuan-Shih Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Formosa University, No. 64, Wunhua Road, Huwei, Yunlin, 632, Taiwan
Jain-Cheng Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Formosa University, No. 64, Wunhua Road, Huwei, Yunlin, 632, Taiwan
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

We propose a nonscanning three-dimensional (3D) optical microscope based on reflectivity-height transformation in applications of biological and transparent plate measurements. The reflectivity of a prism can be transformed to the surface height of the specimen based on geometrical optics and the principle of internal reflection. Thus, the pattern of reflectivity is representative of the surface profile. Using charge-coupled device cameras to obtain the two-dimensional image patterns and combining with its reflectivity pattern, the 3D profile can be generated. The lateral resolution is determined by the diffraction limit, and the vertical resolution is better than several nanometers according to the incident angle and polarization used.

Type
Software, Techniques, and Equipment Development
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2013

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Nonscanning Three-Dimensional Optical Microscope Based on the Reflectivity-Height Transformation for Biological Measurements
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