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The Mechanism of {113} Defect Formation in Silicon: Clustering of Interstitial–Vacancy Pairs Studied by In Situ High-Resolution Electron Microscope Irradiation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 August 2013

Ludmila I. Fedina
Affiliation:
Institute of Semiconductor Physics, pr. Lavrentjeva 13, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia
Se Ahn Song*
Affiliation:
Quality Headquarters, Dongjin Semichen Co. Ltd., Hwaseong, 445-935, Korea
Andrey L. Chuvilin
Affiliation:
CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, Av. de Tolosa 76, 20018 San Sebastian, Spain
Anton K. Gutakovskii
Affiliation:
Institute of Semiconductor Physics, pr. Lavrentjeva 13, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia
Alexander V. Latyshev
Affiliation:
Institute of Semiconductor Physics, pr. Lavrentjeva 13, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: seahnsong@naver.com
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Abstract

We report the direct visualization of point defect clustering in {113} planes of silicon crystal using a transmission electron microscope, which was supported by structural modeling and high-resolution electron microscope image simulations. In the initial stage an accumulation of nonbonded interstitial–vacancy (I–V) pairs stacked at a distance of 7.68 Å along neighboring atomic chains located on the {113} plane takes place. Further broadening of the {113} defect across its plane is due to the formation of planar fourfold coordinated defects (FFCDs) perpendicular to chains accumulating I–V pairs. Closely packed FFCDs create a sequence of eightfold rings in the {113} plane, providing sites for additional interstitials. As a result, the perfect interstitial chains are built on the {113} plane to create an equilibrium structure. Self-ordering of point defects driven by their nonisotropic strain fields is assumed to be the main force for point defect clustering in the {113} plane under the existence of an energy barrier for their recombination.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2013 

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