Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-2qt69 Total loading time: 0.342 Render date: 2022-08-16T19:03:24.820Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Immunoprobe Localization by Correlative Microscopy: How Much Resolution is Enough?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 July 2020

Patricia G. Calarco*
Affiliation:
Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, CA94143

Extract

With the advent of new ways to image biological material, to tag biological molecules, and to prepare samples, much progress has been made in understanding cellular and subcellular function without resorting to classical electron microscopy. Newer ways to image include the use of microscopies such as: differential interference, video, confocal, near field scanning optical, and magnetic resonance imaging. The use of tags such as cell-permeant organelle-specific markers and green fluorescent protein has further increased our ability to vision subcellular events in living cells, providing us with functional correlations of gene activity and cellular function in a number of biological systems. Techniques such as high pressure freezing coupled with freeze substitution have expanded the range of tissues and organisms that can be optimally preserved and are changing our understanding of cellular fine structure. However, even when electron microscopy is mandated, 1-2 angstrom resolution is rarely indicated except for investigations of molecular structure.

Type
Labeling for Microscopy and Correlative Microscopy
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Calarco, P. 1995. Polarization of mitochondria in the unfertilized mouse oocyte. Dev. Genet. 16:3643.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Calarco, P. 2000. Centrosome Precursors in the Acentriolar Mouse Oocyte. J. Micro Res Tech. (in press)3.0.CO;2-K>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Calarco, P. Immunoprobe Localization by Correlative Microscopy. Micros. & Microanal. (in press)Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Immunoprobe Localization by Correlative Microscopy: How Much Resolution is Enough?
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Immunoprobe Localization by Correlative Microscopy: How Much Resolution is Enough?
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Immunoprobe Localization by Correlative Microscopy: How Much Resolution is Enough?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *