Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-bkjnw Total loading time: 0.243 Render date: 2021-10-22T23:13:16.633Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The External Ion Microbeam of the LABEC Laboratory in Florence: Some Applications to Cultural Heritage

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 May 2011

Silvia Calusi*
Affiliation:
INFN, Sezione di Firenze and Università di Firenze, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Via G. Sansone, 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI), Italy
*
Corresponding author. E-mail: calusi@fi.infn.it

Abstract

Ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques are a powerful analytical tool used to investigate the composition and structure of precious materials principally because they can be applied in atmosphere. Thus, the sample can be analyzed as is, and heating and charging effects are strongly diminished. Since IBA measurements can be made with low ion currents and acquisition time, the damage risk is limited. At the microbeam line of the LABEC laboratory, it is possible to exploit the potentials of IBA techniques in an external set up to reconstruct the distribution maps of all the detected elements over the analyzed area with spatial resolutions as low as 10 μm. This is an important feature when objects with inhomogeneous structures—on a scale of hundred microns or so—are investigated, as happens in some cases with artworks. The detection set up installed on our external microbeam allows us to use different IBA techniques simultaneously. Thus, in a single measurement run, it is possible to obtain complementary information on both sample composition and structure. Some applications to works of art are presented here as examples of the analytical capabilities of the external scanning microbeam in the cultural heritage field.

Type
Analysis of Cultural Heritage Special Section
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Balbi De Caro, S. (1993). La moneta a Roma e in Italia, vol. I, pp. 832. Rome, Italy: Ed. Banca d'Italia.Google Scholar
Benvenuti, M., Chiarantini, L., Costagliola, P., Giunti, I., Dini, A., Giuntini, L. & Massi, M. (2007). An investigation of unworked lumps of Cu-based materials (‘Aes Rude’) from two Etruscan sites. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference Archaeometallurgy in Europe, Grado, 17–21 Maggio, 2007. Milan, Italy: Associazione Italiana di Metallurgia.Google Scholar
Breese, M.B.H., Jamieson, D.N. & King, P.I.C. (1996). Materials Analysis Using a Nuclear Microprobe. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.Google Scholar
Calusi, S., Colombo, E., Giuntini, L., Lo Giudice, A., Manfredotti, C., Massi, M., Pratesi, G. & Vittone, E. (2008). The ionoluminescence apparatus at the LABEC external microbeam facility. Nucl Instrum Methods Phys Res B 266, 23062310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cipriani, C., Innocenti, C. & Trosti-Ferroni, R. (1988). The collection of the Mineralogical Museum of Florence: VI) The lapis lazuli. Museological Sci V, 1730.Google Scholar
Craddock, P.T. (1995). Early Metal Mining and Production. Edinburgh, UK: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Cuitiño, L. (1986). Mineralogia y genesis del yacimiento de lapislazuli Flor de los Andes, Coquimbo, Norte del Chile. Revista Geologica de Chile 27, 5567.Google Scholar
El Marraki, A., Schvoerer, M. & Bechtel, F. (2000). Luminescence de cristaux de dévitrivication de wollastonite dans des verres non dopés et dopés en Eu, Dy et Tm. Phys Status Solidi A 181, 491507.3.0.CO;2-L>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fortuna, A. & Giovannoni, F. (1989). Il Lago degli Idoli. Testimonianze etrusche in Falterona. Florence, Italy: Edizioni le Lettere.Google Scholar
Giuntini, L., Massi, M. & Calusi, S. (2007). The external scanning proton microprobe of Firenze: A comprehensive description. Nucl Instrum Methods Phys Res A 576, 266273.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grassi, N. (2009). Differential and scanning-mode external PIXE for the analysis of the painting “Ritratto Trivulzio” by Antonello da Messina. Nucl Instrum Meth Phys Res B 267, 825831.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grassi, N., Giuntini, L., Mandò, P.A. & Massi, M. (2007). Advantages of scanning-mode ion beam analysis for the study of cultural heritage. Nucl Instrum Meth Phys Res B 256, 712718.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johansson, S.A.E., Campbell, J.L. & Malmqvist, K.G. (Eds.) (1995). Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE). Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.Google Scholar
Lo Giudice, A., Re, A., Calusi, S., Giuntini, L., Massi, M., Olivero, P., Pratesi, G., Albonico, M. & Conz, E. (2009). Multitechnique characterization of lapis lazuli for provenance study. Anal Bioanal Chem 395, 22112217.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Long, J.V.P. & Agrell, S.O. (1965). The cathodo-luminescence of minerals in thin section. Mineral Mag 34, 318326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mandò, P.A. (2009). INFN-LABEC—Nuclear techniques for cultural heritage and environmental applications. Nucl Phys News 19, 512.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Migliori, A., Grassi, N. & Mandò, P.A. (2008a). Scanning-PIXE analysis of gold lace embroideries in a relic of St. Francis. Nucl Instrum Methods Phys Res B 266, 23392342.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Migliori, A., Massi, M. & Giuntini, L. (2008b). Analysis of ancient embroideries by IBA techniques. Surf Eng 24, 98102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nava, S., Becherini, F., Bernardi, A., Bonazza, A., Chiari, M., García-Orellana, I., Lucarelli, F., Ludwig, N., Migliori, A., Sabbioni, C., Udisti, R., Valli, G. & Vecchi, R. (2010). An integrated approach to assess air pollution threats to cultural heritage in a semi-confined environment: The case study of Michelozzo's Courtyard in Florence (Italy). Sci Total Env 408, 14031413.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Salomon, J., Dran, J.-C., Guillou, T., Moignard, B., Pichon, L., Walter, P. & Mathis, F. (2008). Present and future role of ion beam analysis in the study of cultural heritage materials: The example of the AGLAE facility. Nucl Instrum Methods Phys Res B 266, 22732278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schweppe, H. & Winter, J. (1997). Artists' Pigments, A Handbook of Their History and Characteristics. Fitzhugh, E.W. (Ed.), vol. 3. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Scott, D.A. (1991). Metallography and Microstructure of Ancient and Historic Metals. Los Angeles, CA: The Paul Getty Trust.Google Scholar
7
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The External Ion Microbeam of the LABEC Laboratory in Florence: Some Applications to Cultural Heritage
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The External Ion Microbeam of the LABEC Laboratory in Florence: Some Applications to Cultural Heritage
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The External Ion Microbeam of the LABEC Laboratory in Florence: Some Applications to Cultural Heritage
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *