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The Distribution and Possible Role of ERK8 in Mouse Oocyte Meiotic Maturation and Early Embryo Cleavage

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 January 2013

Shang-Wu Yang
Affiliation:
Center for Reproductive Medicine, Department of Ob/Gy, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou City, Guangdong Province, China State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China Department of Ob/Gy, Nanhai People's Hospital, Foshan City, Guangdong Province, China
Hao Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Ob/Gy, Nanhai People's Hospital, Foshan City, Guangdong Province, China
Chen Gao
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changbai Rd 155, Beijing, China
Lei Chen
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Shu-Tao Qi
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Fei Lin
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Jian-Xin Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosurgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China
Yi Hou
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Fu-Qi Xing
Affiliation:
Center for Reproductive Medicine, Department of Ob/Gy, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou City, Guangdong Province, China
Qing-Yuan Sun
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Corresponding

Abstract

It is well known that extracellular signal-regulated kinase 8 (ERK8) plays pivotal roles in various mitotic events. But its physiological roles in oocyte meiotic maturation remain unclear. In this study, we found that although no specific ERK8 signal was detected in oocyte at the germinal vesicle stage, ERK8 began to migrate to the periphery of chromosomes shortly after germinal vesicle breakdown. At prometaphase I, metaphase I (MI), anaphase I, telophase I, and metaphase II (MII) stages, ERK8 was stably detected at the spindles. By taxol treatment, we clarified that the ERK8 signal was stained on the spindle fibers as well as microtubule asters in MI and MII oocytes. In fertilized eggs, the ERK8 signal was not observed in the two pronuclei stages. At prometaphase, metaphase, and anaphase of the first mitosis, ERK8 was detected on the mitotic spindle. ERK8 knock down by antibody microinjection and specific siRNA caused abnormal spindles, failed chromosome congression, and decreased first polar body extrusion. Taken together, our results suggest that ERK8 plays an important role in spindle organization during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo cleavage.

Type
Biological Applications
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2013

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