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Characterization of the Interface in a TiC Reinforced Ti-6%A1-4%V Composite Using Monte Carlo Simulations and FEGSEM.

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 July 2020

Raynald Gauvin
Affiliation:
Département de génie mécanique, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, CanadaJ1K2R1
Priti Wanjara
Affiliation:
Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, CanadaH3A 2A7.
Robin A.L. Drew
Affiliation:
Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, CanadaH3A 2A7.
Steve Yue
Affiliation:
Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, CanadaH3A 2A7.

Extract

Metal matrix composite (MMC) materials are promising materials because of their higher specific mechanical properties (e.g. strength-to-weight ratio) relative to conventional metallic alloys. However, during the processing of these materials, the development of an interfacial reaction zone between the reinforcing material (generally a ceramic) and the metallic matrix may occur, which typically degrades the mechanical properties of these materials if not controlled. Since these interfaces are generally quite small (from 5 to 500 nm), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is the technique of choice for characterization because of its outstanding spatial resolution. However, specimen preparation for TEM (e.g. ion milling) is quite difficult for MMC materials, due to the combination of two completely different material types, specifically a hard and brittle reinforcement phase incorporated in a relatively soft metallic matrix. Also, since there is only a small amount of the material which is transparent to electrons after specimen preparation, TEM as a materials characterization technique suffers from a lack of statistical robustness, which is a serious drawback.

To characterize materials with a spatial resolution close to that of TEM, low voltage field emission scanning electron microscopy is an option because of the small interaction volume of low energy electrons, as well as the small probe size of these microscopes (typically < 5 nm).

Type
Segregation and Diffusion Analysis in Materials
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 1997

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References

[1]Wanjara, P., Drew, R.A.L., Yue, S. and Root, J., “Interfacial Reaction Analysis for Ti-6%Al-4%V/TiC Particulate Reinforced Composites”, Proceedings of Light Metals 1996, eds. Avedesian, M., Guilbault, R. and Ksinsik, D., 35th Conference of Metallurgists, CIM, Montreal, pp. 641650.Google Scholar
[2]Gauvin, R.et al.,(1997), “ CASINO, A New Era in the Simulation of Electron Trajectories in Solids, Part I, II and III”, Scanning Vol. 19, pp. 114,20-28 and 29-35.Google Scholar

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Characterization of the Interface in a TiC Reinforced Ti-6%A1-4%V Composite Using Monte Carlo Simulations and FEGSEM.
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