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A probabilistic way to discover the rainbow

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 February 2022

Joscha Prochno
Affiliation:
Faculty of Computer, Science and Mathematics, University of Passau, Innstrasse 33, 94032 Passau, Germany e-mail: joscha.prochno@uni-passau.de
Michael Schmitz
Affiliation:
University of Flensburg, Auf dem Campus 1, 24943 Flensburg, Germany, e-mail: michael.schmitz@uni-flensburg.de

Extract

A slogan that you find on the back of a pack of Skittles candy says ‘No two rainbows are the same. Neither are two packs of Skittles. Enjoy an odd mix.’ An online blog [1] describes how the blogger found two identical packs of Skittles, among 468 packs with a total of 27,740 Skittles. Meticulously collecting the data for this experiment was apparently triggered by some earlier calculations. More precisely, the blogger writes:

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Articles
Copyright
© The Authors, 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Mathematical Association

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References

PossiblyWrong. Follow-up: I found two identical packs of Skittles, among 468 packs with a total of 27,740 Skittles, accessed 06/12/2021 at https://possiblywrong.wordpress.com/2019/04/06/follow-up-i-found-two-identical-packs-of-skittles-among-468-packs-with-a-total-of-27740-skittles/ Google Scholar
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