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The Court Jester Is Universal…But Is He Still Relevant?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 September 2015

Abstract

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Type
Dialogue, Debate, and Discussion
Copyright
Copyright © The International Association for Chinese Management Research 2015 

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The Court Jester Is Universal…But Is He Still Relevant?
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