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Country Context in Management Research: Learning from John Child

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 June 2015

Joseph L. C. Cheng
Affiliation:
University of New South Wales, Australia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

In honouring John Child receiving the 2012 IACMR Lifetime Contribution Award, we present this Editors’ Forum to showcase his research into the influence of country context on organizations. The forum starts with an invited paper by Child and Marinova that analyzes the challenges faced by Chinese firms in their outward foreign investment. This is followed by four commentaries from Klaus Meyer, Peter Murmann, Kwok Leung, and Gordon Redding. The forum concludes with some reflections by Child and Marinova on the commentaries. Collectively, these six papers provide rich and inspiring insights into John Child’s approach to research and how we can learn from it. Five general observations are offered as suggestions for improving current research practice, including: (1) deepening contextual understanding; (2) theorizing across disciplines; (3) respecting the phenomenon; (4) recognizing cultural contingencies; and (5) rebalancing research criteria.

摘要

摘要

为了向荣获2012年IACMR终身贡献奖的John Child致敬,我们呈献了这个主编论坛来展示他有关国家情境对组织影响的研究。本论坛以Child和Marinova的受邀论文开始,这篇论文分析了中国企业对外投资面临的挑战。随后是由Klaus Meyer, Peter Murmann, Kwok Leung和Gordon Redding等人所作的评论。最后是Child和Marinova对上述评论进行的评论。总体而言,这六篇论文所提供的丰富且具有启发性的见解,有助于了解John Child的研究方法,并帮助我们了解如何从中学习。为提高当前的研究实践提供了五点观察,包括:(1)深化情境性的理解,(2)跨学科的理论建构,(3)尊重现象,(4)承认文化的权变性,以及(5)研究标准的再平衡。

Type
Forum Introduction
Copyright
Copyright © International Association for Chinese Management Research 2014

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