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Hypogymnia in the Himalayas of India and Nepal

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 August 2012

B. McCUNE
Affiliation:
Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-2902, USA. Email: mccuneb@onid.orst.edu
P. K. DIVAKAR
Affiliation:
Departamento de Biologia Vegetal II, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
D. K. UPRETI
Affiliation:
Lichenology Laboratory, National Botanical Research Institute (CSIR), Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow(UP)-226001, India

Abstract

Morphological and chemical studies of Hypogymnia from the Himalayas revealed one new species, three species new to the region, and a previously unrecognized synonym. Hypogymnia crystallina, distinguished by its rimmed holes in the lobe axils, a pruinose disc, POL+ epihymenium, and distinctive chemistry (zeorin, hypoprotocetraric acid, usnic acid and atranorin) is described as new. Hypogymnia pseudohypotrypa (Asah.) A. Singh is synonymized with H. thomsoniana and a second location is reported for the recently described H. sikkimensis. Hypogymnia bitteri, H. mundata, and H. subarticulata are reported as new to India. A total of 17 species of the genus Hypogymnia are accepted for the Himalayan region of India and Nepal, with one additional species from southern India. A key is given to the species known from this region.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Lichen Society 2012

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