Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-w6vhv Total loading time: 0.229 Render date: 2022-11-26T20:52:19.002Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

A Critical Analysis of the Significance of the eCourts Information Systems in Indian Courts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2020

Abstract

Technological developments and scientific innovations have enhanced the way people live and work. Courts are places where people seek justice and millions of cases across the globe are examined every day, and judgments are delivered. The courts system in India is on a vast and complex scale. The application and dissemination of information in India has been spreading at a faster pace over the past few decades. This has set the stage for the computerisation of courts to enhance transparency and efficiency in the Indian judicial system. The Indian sub-continent is a highly populated nation and from 2007 the government of India began implementing the eCourts Project as a citizen-centric initiative for expeditious and affordable justice delivery. This article analyses the various dimensions involved in the eCourts process and explains its significance in the justice delivery system in India. In also looks at the various challenges of implementing such a vast system across judicial system of India.

Type
International Perspectives
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2020. Published by British and Irish Association of Law Librarians

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.User Manual Published by Honourable E-Committee of Supreme Court of India and Department of Justice, Government of IndiaGoogle Scholar
6.Wells, Christina E., ‘National Security Information and the Freedom of Information Act’ (2004) 56(4) Administrative Law Review pp. 11951221. www.jstor.org/stable/40712195 accessed 19/02/2020Google Scholar
1
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A Critical Analysis of the Significance of the eCourts Information Systems in Indian Courts
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

A Critical Analysis of the Significance of the eCourts Information Systems in Indian Courts
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

A Critical Analysis of the Significance of the eCourts Information Systems in Indian Courts
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *