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Thermodynamic properties and thermal conductivity of high density deuterium

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2009

Kazuko Inoue
Affiliation:
Faculty of Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564
Tomio Ariyasu
Affiliation:
Faculty of Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564

Abstract

The phase diagram of high density (1023 ˜ 1027/cm3) deuterium is obtained by calculation. The values of specific heat, electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity in the metallic state are estimated over a wide range of temperature (10−2 ˜ 104 eV). The temperature dependences of these properties are shown in figures with the density. When TTf (Tf: the Fermi temperature of electrons), the behavior is very similar to those of normal metals. At high temperatures where TTf, the behavior is similar to that of completely ionized classical plasma.

This fundamental data for deuterium will help us understand the properties of fuel in inertial-confinement fusion and to solve the fluid equations for efficient compression of fuel pellets.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1987

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