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Theoretical model for heat conduction in metals during interaction with ultra short laser pulse

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 September 2006

MUHAMMAD SHAHBAZ ANWAR
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan
ANWAR LATIF
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan
M. IQBAL
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan
M. SHAHID RAFIQUE
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan
M. KHALEEQ-UR-RAHMAN
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan
SOFIA SIDDIQUE
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan

Abstract

Theoretical studies have been performed on the interaction of short laser pulse with metals. The results of the theoretical model indicate that heat conduction would not be uniform from focal spot or crater at the surface of target metal, when an ultra short laser will interact with the metal. The electromagnetic radiations of laser induce electric field inside the target that is responsible for the induction of current density, which causes electronic heat conduction in the direction of current density. Such an effect is dominant for laser pulse having duration less than of the order of sub-picoseconds. This mode will open a new significant field of study to discuss laser metal interaction for ultra short laser pulses.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2006 Cambridge University Press

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