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Superficial changes on the Inconel 600 superalloy by picosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064, 532, and 266 nm: Comparative study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2012

J. Stašić*
Affiliation:
VINČA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
B. Gaković
Affiliation:
VINČA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
M. Trtica
Affiliation:
VINČA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
T. Desai
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Applied Mathematics, Jaynagar, Bangalore, India
L. Volpe
Affiliation:
Universita degli Studi Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Milano, Italy
*
Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Jelena Stašić, VINČA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. BOX 522, 11001 Belgrade, Serbia. E-mail: jelsta@vinca.rs

Abstract

A comparative study of superficial changes on the superalloy Inconel 600, induced by a picosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064, 532, and 266 nm, is presented. All of the laser wavelengths, as well as the used fluences of 2.5 (1064 nm), 4.3 (532 nm), and 0.6 J/cm2 (266 nm) were found to be adequate for inducing surface variations. Quite different surface features were produced depending on the laser wavelength used. The measured surface damage thresholds were 0.25, 0.13 and 0.10 J/cm2 for 1064, 532, and 266 nm, respectively. Drastic differences, in function of the wavelength used, were recorded for the crater depths, as well the appearance of hydrodynamic effects and periodic surface structures. Differences in crater depths were explained via an easier propagation of the first harmonic laser radiation (1064 nm) through the ejected material and plasma compared to a radiation at 532 and 266 nm. Finally, changes in the surface oxygen content caused by ultrashort laser pulses were considered.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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References

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Superficial changes on the Inconel 600 superalloy by picosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064, 532, and 266 nm: Comparative study
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Superficial changes on the Inconel 600 superalloy by picosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064, 532, and 266 nm: Comparative study
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