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Repetitively pulsed high-current accelerators with transformer charging of forming lines

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 August 2003

GENNADY A. MESYATS
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
SERGEI D. KOROVIN
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
ALEXANDER V. GUNIN
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
VLADIMIR P. GUBANOV
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
ALEKSEI S. STEPCHENKO
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
DMITRY M. GRISHIN
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
VLADIMIR F. LANDL
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
PAVEL I. ALEKSEENKO
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia

Abstract

This article describes the principles of operation and the parameters of the SINUS setups designed at the Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Science, over the period from 1990 to 2002. A characteristic feature of accelerators of the SINUS type is the use of coaxial forming lines (in particular, with a spiral central conductor) which are charged by a built-in Tesla transformer to produce the accelerating high-voltage pulses. This ensures a reasonable compactness and long lifetime of the setups.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2003 Cambridge University Press

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