Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-ttngx Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-21T10:49:10.963Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Bifurcating energy-angular spectrum of electrons accelerated by intense laser pulse

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2007

D. Lin
Affiliation:
The Key Laboratory of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
Y.K. HO
Affiliation:
The Key Laboratory of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
Q. Kong
Affiliation:
The Key Laboratory of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
Z. Chen
Affiliation:
The Key Laboratory of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
P.X. Wang
Affiliation:
The Key Laboratory of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
J.J. Xu
Affiliation:
The Key Laboratory of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
S. Kawata
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Japan

Abstract

Bifurcation phenomenon in the energy-angular correlation spectrum of the vacuum laser acceleration has been observed with computer simulation. Concerning a focused laser pulse, the classical single-valued energy-angular correlation spectrum for a plane wave is, besides broadened to a band, bifurcated with the classical value in between the two branches. Analytic expression to describe the correlation has been derived and physical explanations based on the ponderomotive potential model and Lorentz-Newton force analyses are presented. The theoretical results are supported by numerical simulations which have been compared with the experimental results. This study is helpful in designing vacuum laser acceleration experiments.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2007 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)