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Joint colloquium on plurilingualism and language education: Opportunities and challenges, (AAAL/TESOL)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2015

Sue Garton
Affiliation:
Aston Universitys.garton@aston.ac.uk
Ryuko Kubota
Affiliation:
Faculty of Education, University of British Columbiaryuko.kubota@ubc.ca

Extract

This colloquium was organised by Ryuko Kubota (University of British Columbia, Canada) and Sue Garton (Aston University, UK) as part of the collaboration between the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL) and TESOL International Association.

Type
Research in Progress
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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References

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Joint colloquium on plurilingualism and language education: Opportunities and challenges, (AAAL/TESOL)
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