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Triadic directives in Navajo language socialization

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 January 2002

MARGARET FIELD
Affiliation:
San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Dr., San Diego, CA 92182-8134, mfield@mail.sdsu.edu

Abstract

This article argues that certain aspects of language use may be more resistant to change than is language code. In communities undergoing language shift, researchers have noted ways in which indigenous patterns of interaction may be retained after the language used has shifted to English. It is argued that aspects of a speech community's interaction that are most tacit are also the most resistant to change, and are maintained through mundane routines and forms of everyday interaction. Such contexts for language use typically are the focus in studies of language socialization, which bring the theoretical perspectives of both practice theory and Bakhtinian dialogicality to bear on the question of how interactional and linguistic routines are maintained and transmitted across generations. Analysis here focuses on one particular interactional routine: the giving of directives involving a triadic participation structure, between caregivers and children in a Navajo community.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2001 Cambridge University Press

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