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Planning language treatment: linguistics for the third world1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 December 2008

Björn H. Jernudd
Affiliation:
Culture Learning Institute, East-West Center

Abstract

I shall argue that adoption of linguistics at institutions of higher learning in its present international disciplinary form, and in its expression through the medium of English (because English is a major foreign or second language in much of the world and the by far dominant language for the discipline of linguistics), can be contrary to the public good in less developed countries (LDCs) and emerging speech communities. Linguistics in its current international disciplinary form serves needs different from those of emerging speech communities, where a new language treatment system ought to be created by a new cadre of caretakers of the community's language resources. (Language planning; developing countries; linguistics as an international discipline; English)

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1981

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