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Naming fish: A problem exploration

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 December 2008

Björn H. Jernudd
Affiliation:
Institute of Culture and CommunicationEast-West Center
Elizabeth Thuan
Affiliation:
Institute of Culture and CommunicationEast-West Center

Abstract

There is a lack of perception of the interrelatedness of the three fish-naming systems: the scientific, the common, and the folk naming systems. Ichthyologists and regulators of fish names do not sufficiently appreciate the motivations and intricacies of folk naming systems or problems of professional and commercial use of names. At the common name level, there seems to be little exchange of information concerning problems and solutions, objectives, and procedures. Also, communities and networks that use the same language(s) seek different solutions to the same or equivalent naming problems. The authors list some common problems and offer a tentative classification. (Taxonomy, naming, language planning, fisheries)

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1984

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References

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