Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-6c8bd87754-qjg4w Total loading time: 0.285 Render date: 2022-01-20T08:51:59.869Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Gender, publication and citation in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology: The construction of a scholarly canon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2003

BONNIE McELHINNY
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 1052, Toronto, ON M5S 3G3, Canada
MARIJKE HOLS
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 1052, Toronto, ON M5S 3G3, Canada
JEFF HOLTZKENER
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 1052, Toronto, ON M5S 3G3, Canada
SUSANNE UNGER,
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 1052, Toronto, ON M5S 3G3, Canada
CLAIRE HICKS
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 1052, Toronto, ON M5S 3G3, Canada

Abstract

Feminist scholars have begun to ask how existing conceptual schemes and organizational structures in academic disciplines have excluded women and feminist ideas, and to provide suggestions for transformation. One strand of this work has been the exploration of how canons of thought are constructed in such fields as economics, sociology, and sociocultural anthropology. This article begins such an investigation for sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology by reviewing how gender correlates with publication and citation over a 35-year period (1965–2000) in five key journals, and in 16 textbooks published in the 1990s. It describes some marked differences in the publication of works by women and on gender in the five journals, as well as some significant differences in the degree to which men and women cite the work of women. It also considers how the rate of publication of articles on sex, gender, and women is correlated with publication of female authors. It concludes with a discussion of the implications of this study for changing institutional practices in our field.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2003 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
31
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Gender, publication and citation in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology: The construction of a scholarly canon
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Gender, publication and citation in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology: The construction of a scholarly canon
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Gender, publication and citation in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology: The construction of a scholarly canon
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *