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Some comments on rule induction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 July 2009

Ivan Bratko
Affiliation:
Kardelj University, Josef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia
Donald Michie
Affiliation:
The Turing Institute, Glasgow, UK

Abstract

Computer induction is discussed in the light of concerns recently expressed by Bloomfield about the use of such algorithms in expert systems construction.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1987

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References

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